BOOKING

ACCOMMODATION

HABITAT

CONTACT

WELCOME

 

Harelaw Cottages

 

Northumberland

 

Photography : Martijn Heemstra

WELCOME

Harelaw House was originally built in 1593 in the reign of Elizabeth 1,when this part of

 

Britain was a lawless frontier between England and Scotland. Numerous castles and fortifications are a testament to these wild and dangerous times.

 

Harelaw house is occupied by the present owners. The two adjoining self-catering cottages, Leveret and Hoolit were restored in 2004 to a high standard and have everything you need for a comfortable stay.

ACCOMMODATION

Harelaw house is occupied by the present owners. The two adjoining self-catering cottages, Leveret and Hoolit were restored in 2004 to a high standard and have everything you need for a comfortable stay.

Hoolit Cottage

Leveret Cottage

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Duis fermentum pretium consequat. Etiam aliquet enim erat, sed commodo velit varius vestibulum. Fusce porttitor velit eu enim ultricies, sit amet vulputate ante posuere. Curabitur egestas gravida nibh, a faucibus arcu lu ommodo velit varius vestibulum. Fusce porttitor velit eu enim ultricies, sit amet vulputate ante posuere. Curabitur egestas gravida nibh, a faucibus arcu luctusctus vitae. Etiam cursus, dui ac mollis ultrices, quam arcu s in risus. Praesent ac semper dui, in tincidunt quam. Donec jommodo velit varius vestibulum. Fusce porttitor velit eu enim ultricies, sit amet vulputate ante posuere. Curabitur egestas gravida nibh, a faucibus arcu luctususto risus, pretium vitae elit quis, consectetur pellentesque quam. Cras augue

luctus enim, at laoreet leo diam nec erat. Mauris vitae volutpat elit. Vivamus ullamcorper sit amet justo in lobaortis. Vivamus ex velit, viverra et tincidunt at, mattis in risus. Praesent ac semper dui, in tincidunt quam. Donec jommodo velit varius vestibulum. Fusce porttitor velit eu enim ultricies, sit amet vulputate ante posuere. Curabitur egestas gravida nibh, a faucibus arcu luctususto risus, pretium vitae elit quis, consectetur pellentesque quam. Cras augue augue, iaculis ac nunc eu. s in risus. Praesent ac semper dui, in tincidunt quam. Donec jommodo velit varius vestibulum. Fusce porttitor velit eu enim ultricies, sit amet vulputate ante posuere. Curabitur egestas gravida nibh, a faucibus arcu luctususto risus, pretium vitae elit quis, consectetur pellentesque quam. Cras augue

BOOKING

To book a cottage note the prices and conditions listed below, check for availability for using the View booking calendar link for chosen cottage then book using this booking form.

Hoolit Cottage

Weekly Bookings

Oct 1st – April 30th……….£260.00
May 1st – Sept 30th………£380.00

 

Low Season short breaks
£150.00 for 3 nights (extra night £45.00)

Leveret Cottage

Weekly Bookings

Oct 1st – April 30th……….£250.00
May 1st – Sept 30th………£340.00

 

Low Season short breaks
£135.00 for 3 nights (extra night £40.00)

 

 

 

Leveret and Hoolit Cottages are let from Saturday to Saturday.

 

Weekly bookings are from 3.00 pm on the day of arrival until 10.00 am on the day of departure.

 

Short breaks may be available.

 

Our prices are fully inclusive.
Full central heating, hot water, electricity and logs for the wood burning stoves, towels and bed linen are all included. Like all the outlying properties in the valley, the water supply for the cottages comes from a local spring.

A provisional booking, made by telephoning 01890 850327, or via email to harelawcot@outlook.com must be confirmed with a completed booking form and a deposit of £50 per week received by us within seven days.

The client will be sent a confirmation of booking and the balance will become due 6 weeks before the commencement of the holiday. If the client cancels the booking then the rent, including the deposit, will be refunded less £10 administration fee, only if the property is re-let.

We recommend clients to take out cancellation insurance.


We do not accept liability for any loss, damage, sickness or injury,howsoever caused, to the client or any member of the party, or any of their possessions.


The main condition of acceptance of any booking is that good care is taken of the property and contents. It must also be left clean and tidy

 

 

HABITAT

Dutch Elm Disease

The Harelaw cottages are set in 2 acre grounds which were originally semi-ancient Elm woodland with a smattering of ancient Oaks, Ash, Wild cherries, Yews and Hollies with an under-story of elder, hawthorn and dog rose. Adjacent to the drive runs a small seasonal stream which has been left wild along much of its length. In the late 1980's Dutch elm disease hit the valley, and when Harelaw was purchased only the ghostly white dead trunks remained. Taking this as a positive, the loss of the matures elms gave us the scope to create diverse habitats of native and non native species. Habitat creation works including the following;

Hedge planting

500 metres of native hedgerows have been planted. Wherever possible local provenance (locally collected seed, home germinated and grown) hawthorn and blackthorn have been used as the mainstay. However those naturalist amongst you will note an unusually wide range of UK native species, including bearberry, guilder rose, alder buckthorn, red-berried elder, bullace, spindle, etc, and some wildlife friendly non-natives such as the heavily berrying Himalayan tree cotoneaster and the viciously thorned ‘Arran crab'. All the hedges at Harelaw were 'laid' between 2008 and 2009, but every 5m or so we have left a standard tree, these are mostly to provide fruit for the future, but also include some specimen trees.

On the roadside, where visibility is an issue a ‘scrumping' hedge has been planted. This consists of blackberry, red, yellow, white & Black currants, gooseberry and Jostaberry – all species which should recover from an annual or biannual prune to ground level.

Woodland Replanting

Hundreds of trees and shrubs have been planted around Harelaw with other areas left open and managed Forest Replantas meadows and other pockets left as ‘non-intervention' to allow natural regeneration of yew, holly hawthorn and ash. Our aim has been to create discrete but flowing patches of woodland. We have areas of willow, poplar & alder which are coppiced or pollarded with the long-term aim of providing firewood for the cottages (along with thinning of sycamore).  In addition we have a birch grove, a pine knoll and a host of would be specimen trees dotted around the place.
Throughout the property we have planted a large number of fruit trees - again grafted ourselves. There are some 40 varieties of apple, 15 pears, 10 plums & gages, 7 cherries and 4 hazel nuts, not to mention a range of more exotic hard and soft fruits however they are not pampered or chemically treated and will have to be tough to survive the hard annual frosts, winds and usual summer drought.

 

 

Meadow planting

Three small areas of meadow have been created by spreading yellow rattle and sowing hand collected native flower and grass seed. There is woodland meadow, a Spring meadow and a Summer meadow. These are managed to allow the growth flowering and seed setting of woodland, spring and summer flowers respectively. These are very small areas, but have a great diversity of plant and insect life

 

Wildlife Pond

In 2004 (when the builders were hard at sleep), I borrowed the digger and excavated a small pond! This was lined, gravel tipped in andstocked with native (water lilies excepted – Mothers!!!!) plants. That autumn (yes autumn!) we had frog spawn and the following spring frogs, toads and palmate newts were breeding.

 

The pond is still in the process or reaching equilibrium, but we have high hopes. Already we have seen 5 species of water-beetle, 2 damselfly, 1 dragonfly and a host of other beasties including leeches.

 

Birds of Harelaw

Ok it's a bit over the top, but at Harelaw we have created over 100 artificial nesting sites for birds. These include; •  Kestrel boxes (used by Jackdaws), •  Tawny owl boxes (used by Jackdaws), •  A Barn Owl nesting box inside Hoolit cottage (used by Tawny owls over the winter, Little owls in early spring, Jackdaws in 2004/5, but since 2006 has been used by Barn owls each year)•  70 (plus) assorted smaller hole and open fronted boxes. •  More than 30 access hole into nest chambers beneath the stone cladding of both Leveret and Hoolit cottages. •  Plaster of paris House Martin and Swallow cups.

Others known to nest in or within 500m of Harelaw (in previous years); Barn owl, Tawny Owl, Buzzard, Greater spotted woodpecker, Tree-creeper,Wood warbler, Garden warbler, Chiff-chaff, Black-cap, Red-legged partridge, Spotted flycatcher, Greenfinch, Chaffinch, Yellowhammer, Reed Bunting, Pied Wagtail, Yellow Wagtail, House Martin, Sand Martin, Swift, Carrion crow.

And many more seen around and about.

Bats at Harelaw

There are 6 bat boxes around the site, none of which have yet been used. In addition bat access into the loft space of Hoolit and Leveret has been included in the cottage design. You will also be able to see that some 20 roof tiles have been altered to allow access to the space both the normal and ridge tiles. In 2009 I sat at the back door of the main house, and watched at least 120 pipistrelle bats (a maternity colony) leaving from the back of Leveret cottage - what a great sight, and after all that hard work grinding down tiles and creating special access points, they ignored these & found their own spot! In addition to the owl cam, we now have a bat cam (in need of improvement) which gives a great view of the sleeping bats. The downside of this is that my moth trapping success has declined, although I have been able to identify a few species by the discarded wings!! see later

Other mammals at Harelaw.

In addition to the common 45 pipistrelle, a number of other mammals occur at Harelaw; Soprano pipistrelles, brown long-eared bats, wood & house mice, bank vole, pigmy and common shrew, brown rat, hedgehog, hare, weasel, stoat, red and roe deer. In the recent past Harelaw did have the occassional visit from a red squirrel, but following the felling of the coniferous plantation on the hill in 2007, only one has been seen. More alarmingly still the parapox virus carrying grey squirrels are close, and roadkilled individuals have been seen within 2 miles.

CONTACT US

 

CONTACT  US

FIND US ON MAP